Wednesday, December 10, 2008

Period 3 - Elie's relationship with his father

During the reading of Night, you were asked to take notes on two specific changes that Elie faces: his relationship with God and his relationship with his father. We covered the first topic on your open note quiz; you will cover the second topic in this posting.

Topic: What shift is made in Elie's relationship with his father?
Please note: You may not simply say that his relationship changes. Instead, discuss the nature of the change itself.

Things to keep in mind:
  • When doing the goal setting activity at the beginning of this quarter, many of you outlined a plan related to proofreading your writing. Make sure you consult this plan before posting.
  • One of the quotes has to come after chapter 5 of the book. This is requirement, not a suggestion.

This posting is due before the start of class on Monday, December 15th.

20 comments:

twilightmusicaddict94 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
twilightmusicaddict94 said...

Hazel M.
Mrs. Brosnan
Period 3, English I, Honors
December 15, 2008
Change is an unpredictable and inevitable thing. One cannot know what alteration it may bring but it can, without doubt, be expected. Elie, the protagonist in Night, encounters change innumerable times. One of the most significant changes he comes across, while in the camp, is that of his relationship with his father. Before the deportation, he and his father are never intimate nor dependent on each other. The distance between father-and-son is so great that Elie describes his father as one who “...was more concerned with others than his own family” (Wiesel 2). It has dawned on Elie that his father prioritizes other members of the Jewish community rather than his own flesh and blood. Elie’s realization further shows how distant they are from each other because he has learned to just leave things the way they are. Instead of demanding attention from his father, he busies himself with frequent praying and studying the cabbala with Moshe the Beadle, growing closer to him instead. Elie lives with his family but he does not receive the love and affection that a son would usually get from a father. Despite this strained relationship, the bond between father-and-son shifts to a great extent transforming both their lives. After spending countless days at the atrocious camp, Auschwitz, Elie experiences a strengthening of the father-and-son connection they never really shared before. The prisoners, among them Elie and his father, are told to evacuate Auschwitz and head for Gliewitz. Their bodies are riddled with exhaustion and fatigue, yet they run endlessly. When Elie finally decides to sleep, his father tenderly says, “‘Don’t be afraid, son. Sleep—...I’ll look after you myself’” (Weisel 85). This promise is saturated with revelations and implications. Elie and his father have finally learned to lean on one another and provide the care and support they need. Since they live for the other, moral support and encouragement are vital to their survival; thus, the simplest words bring utmost comfort in these tragic conditions. They have grown together and have seen the potential their relationship has. Additionally, they comprehend the fact that they are fully capable of watching and loving each other during these dreadful times. The father has learned to attend to his son, just as Elie learns how significant his father is to him. Though the mocking face of death threatens to obliterate them both, Elie and his father will not let go of one another. The change which touches Elie’s relationship with his father, ultimately is the life vest which saves them from selfishness and insensitivity caused by the need for self-preservation.

Michelle Ting said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alex said...

Elie is an independent child, and never relies on his father. Elie loves his father, but feels no respect for him. He even goes against his father’s words when he is younger. He asks his father if he can find a master to teach him about the cabbala. His father tells him, “‘You’re too young for that’”(Wiesel 1). However, Elie finds a master. He does not respect his father enough to listen to him. He does what he desires to and not what others advise. He is carefree and young, so he does not know any better. Soon after, Elie and his father are sent to a concentration camp. He learns to trust his father and he relies on him more. Unlike many other father and son pairs, Elie and his father have a very close bond. They help each other and give each other hope. When Elie realizes that many sons and fathers are leaving each other behind when they are forced to run for forty-two miles, he makes a decision to remain by his father’s side. He says to God, “My God, Lord of the Universe, give me the strength never to do what Rabbi Eliahou’s son has done”(Wiesel 87). Elie’s father means so much to him that Elie is willing to pray, despite the fact that he has given up faith in God. This is substantial in Elie and his father’s relationship. If he is willing to go against his old theories for his father, it shows how much he needs and loves him. Their relationship flourishes as they spend more time in the dreadful concentration camps. It seems impossible that something so horrifying could change people for the better.

Leana said...

Leana A.
Mrs. Brosnan
Period 3, English I, Honors
December 15, 2008

Throughout life, and even in stories, there are various transformations that occur. In Night by Elie Wiesel, the protagonist—Elie—goes through a dynamic change with his father. At the inception of the story, Elie and his father are very distant, and there is no close relationship between them. Elie’s father does not show “…any display of emotions, even at home. He was more concerned for others rather than with his own family. The Jewish community in Sighet held him in the greatest respect” (Wiesel 2). Elie’s father seems to care for everyone in the community, but his own family. He gives advice to others, and they respect him too, but not for his affection towards his family who are tied to him by his own blood. When two people are close to each other, they can tell each other everything. They show their love, affection, happiness or any other emotion in front of the other person. It insinuates that it does not matter how one acts with another person because they understand each other. Also, Elie’s father does not help him at all, like a normal, loving parent would do. Elie asks for help to find a master to teach him the studies of cabbala. However, his dad rebukes and shows no care to get Elie the best help he can get. Elie and his father’s relationship changes when they are stuck in numerous concentration camps. In one occurrence, Elie “…held onto [his] father’s hand—the old familiar fear: not to lose him” (Wiesel 99). Since he already loses his mother and sisters at Auschwitz, he cannot bear to lose his father too. Because it is an “old familiar feeling”, there is a continuous chain of comforting each other and thoughts about what will happen if they do not have each other. The two are much more reliant of each other, and they are the reason each other will try to stay alive. Furthermore, after being separated from his father, Elie is anxious to find him. When he lays eyes upon his dad, he says, “ ‘Father! I’ve been looking for you for so long…Where were you? Did you sleep?...How do you feel?’” (Wiesel 101). This demonstrates that Elie really cares for him to look for his dad for that amount of time. Elie expresses his concern for his father, especially when he pushes and shoves his way past the rest of the prisoners to get the coffee that his father wants. He is so close to losing him and is at the brim of tears, so when they reunite a rush of emotions pours out—love, happiness, and affection.

Coco T. said...

As the novel Night progresses, Elie Wiesel’s relationship with his dad gets stronger, but then deteriorates. As Elie and his father are taken into the concentration camps, Elie only knows one thing: he wants to stay with his dad. He worried, “My hand shifted on my father’s arm. I had one thought –not to lose him” (Wiesel 27). Elie relies on his father very much. His father is his support, and without him, Elie is lost and alone. That is what Elie, is scared of, being alone and without guidance of help. In the concentration camps it is worse, because the camps are even more frightening. As Elie and his father stay in the camps for more time, the weaker their feelings are for each other. Elie even begins not to care about his father, “…in the recesses of my weakened conscience, could I have searched it, I might perhaps have found something like –free at last!” (Wiesel 106). When his father dies, Elie feels relieved that he does not have to help or wait for his father anymore. He is happy he only has to worry about himself and about his survival. This proves that their relationship starts out strong because they rely on each other, but is weakened as the camps tear them apart. In conclusion, the camps make Elie’s relationship with his father strained and weak as the book progresses.

Jenna said...

Jenna Frederiks
Mrs. Brosnan
Period 3, English I Honors
December 14, 2008
Within every situation, change is known to happen. This is true in relationship of Elie and his father. The role of a father shifts from father to son within Night, by Elie Wiesel. Elie's father constantly says to him, "There aren't any cabbalists at Sighet" (Wiesel 2). Looking out for his son, Elie's father is always reminding him to stay in school and stop studying unnecessary knowledge. Elie's father is regularly telling Elie that he will not find anything through these magical texts, that he must focus on school. Driven by his imagination, Elie goes against his father's wishes anyways. Always considering his future, Elie's father is focused on Elie's school and nothing else. By the near end of the novel, positions change as Elie begins acting like a father. Refusing to sleep until his father does Elie says, "No, you first, father. Go to sleep" (Wiesel 85). In the beginning, Elie's father is watching over him, making sure he is always okay. Although, now Elie must watch over his father, because they are both weak but Elie wants them to remain strong. In order for this to happen, Elie's father must give up his position of father and hand it off to Elie. With this, Elie must learn to not only take care of himself, but also others. Elie and his father experience a change that is drastic, but very necessary.

Anonymous said...

Jasmine Feng
Mrs.Brosnan
Period 3, English I, Honors
December 15, 2008

Sometimes it takes the worst in others to bring out the best in oneself. Sometimes, it is only when the world is at its most cruel, most desolate, when one realizes the importance of friendship, of love, and of family. In Night, Elie Wiesel’s relationship with his father changes greatly as they endure the inhumane horrors of the Holocaust together. When life is still “normal” for Elie and his family, he describes his father as a “cultured, rather unsentimental man. There was never any display of emotion, even at home” (Wiesel 2). To Elie, his father is not truly a father in spirit. Elie does not go to his father for help with his own spiritual needs. Because Elie is deeply religious, a real father would understand and try to help. Instead, his father tries to dissuade him from it. Elie turns to Moshe the Beedle, who, at that point in his life, is more of a father figure than his birth father ever is. However, after his entire family is torn apart when the Germans deport all the Jewish people in his village, their relationship drastically changes. Though there are times when the new bond between them is sorely tested, they nevertheless build up a strong relationship bound together with as much need as love. The author states, “After my father’s death, nothing could touch me anymore…And I had but one desire—to eat. I no longer thought of my father or my mother” (Wiesel 107). During their horrifying ordeal at the hands of the Germans, Elie and his father realize that they can only survive if they work together. The only thing they are holding onto is each other. If they no longer have each other as a reason to live, what then, is the point of life? For the first time in his life, Elie depends on his father. After his father dies, Elie finally breaks. Without his father, he gives up and no longer tries to hold onto his sanity. It is an unhappy world where it takes evilness to force love into people. In an odd, twisted way, the Holocaust does Elie a favor. It allows him and his father to share a true bond as father and son. The change in the relationship between Elie and his father is hard-earned and bittersweet.

Samiksha said...

Samiksha Shetty
Mrs. Brosnan
Period 3, English I Honors
Change is one of the major components in one’s life. It leaves a lasting impression on one’s views of others and themselves. During Elie’s time in the concentration camp his relationship with his father alters. His views of who his father is alter. Before the expulsion, Elie and his father were very distant. They were not dependent of each other’s support. Elie states, “There was never any display of emotion, even at home. He was more concerned with others than his own family” (Wiesel 2). Elie feels that his father never opens up. That he by no means shows his true feelings or even shows any concern for his family. After realizing the cold distant relationship he shares with his father, Elie tries to ignore it. Elie finds a teacher in Moshe the Beadle. Elie’s home life with his father lacks the love that he always desired. However, they begin ton bond in the horrible concentration camps. The treacherous days that they spent together in fear at the camp made the two relay on each other more than ever. Elie states that “What would he do without me? I was his only support” (Wiesel 82). Elie knows he has to keep living as he is the only thing his father has now. Elie and his father become closer now so he understands that without him, his father would not last. Their once distant relationship is now filled with love and understanding for each other. This was only the result of their time spent in the concentration camps. Hence, Elie finally realizes that his father is not as cold and unemotional as he once believed. The time spent in the camps let Elie and his father learn to rely and support each other. The time in terror they spent together made the two realize how important they are to one another. Elie and his father prove that a bond can strengthen for the better even in the worst of times.

Michelle Ting said...

Michelle Ting
Mrs. Brosnan
English I Honors, Period 3
December 15, 2008
After the ghastly and mind-numbing horrors that Eliezer faces in the concentration camps, he is no longer the carefree boy he once was. During this period of his life, he undergoes many dramatic changes, not least of which is his relationship with his father. After facing true horrors at Birkenau and Auschwitz, his initial reaction is to grow farther from his father; however, later on Elie becomes closer to his dad than ever before. After they have spent some time in the concentration camps, Eliezer is so weak from hunger, suffering, and fear that he has no space in him left for compassion for his father. At one point, Idek viciously beats up Elie’s father to the point where he collapses. Elie’s response is, “I had watched the whole scene without moving … In fact I was thinking of how to get farther away so that I would not be hit myself” (Wiesel 52). The fact that Elie does not even try to help his father makes it evident that his loyalty and love for his dad are numbed. Because of the horrors he has faced, Elie now places his own safety far above concern for his father, as shown when he moves away from the scene rather than moving closer to save his father. Later, however, this distance that Elie creates between his father and himself is completely closed. During their run from Buna to a different camp, Elie finds himself slipping towards death. He seriously considers simply giving up and sliding into the snow and therefore into death, but he says, “My father’s presence was the only thing that stopped me” (Wiesel 82). Elie’s father is the rope keeping Elie firmly rooted in life; without him, Elie would die. His entire existence now depends solely on his father, a dramatically different story than before, when he felt that helping his father would lead to his own doom. Similarly, the change can be seen in the way father and son treat each other. When they are in the frigid outdoors, to fall asleep is to die. Thus, Elie tells his father, “I’ll watch over you, and then you can watch over me. We won’t let each other fall asleep. We’ll look after each other” (Wiesel 85). Elie has learned to rely on his father. They are now interdependent, two family members who have learned to bond together to support each other through whatever horrors they face. Now the mutual attitude is no longer “for each his own”; rather, now they truly stand united. The horrors of the Holocaust might have torn them apart at first, but now they are bonded in a relationship stronger than ever before: stronger than any challenges life can throw at them, and stronger than evil itself.

Maggie said...

Maggie Wang
Mrs. Brosnan
Period 3, English I, Honors
December 15, 2008

Throughout the story Night, Elie and his father dramatically changes from total strangers, to having a strong kinship between them. Elie’s father is highly respected in their community. People from the community come to talk to Elie’s father about public and private affairs, hence, leaving little time for the family. Elie states that “He was more concerned with others than with his own family” (Wiesel 2). Elie’s father believes that the problems of the community are far more important than his own family, who he shares the same blood and genes with. However, Elie does not do anything about it. He ignores the fact that he and his father are just like foreigners, and continues to study the cabbala with Moshe the Beadle. Not only does Elie’s father put his community before his own family, but Elie also avoids the fact that he and his father do not act like a pair of father and son. When Elie and his father enter the concentration camp, the need for each other is like a punch in the stomach. They both learn to rely and lean on each other, like family members do. Elie’s need for his father can be shown when he says, “…but I did not want to be separated from my father. We had already suffered so much, borne so much together…” (Wiesel 78). Elie now understands the importance of family, and what he is without them. He already lost his mother and his sisters, so he does not want his father to vanish right in front of his eyes either. Elie and his father go through so many difficult obstacles, yet, they are still able to make it because they are finally able to lean on each other. They understand what family means, and are able to trust each other. This shows a dynamic change between the relationship between Elie and his father, because they finally do not act like strangers anymore. The death camps Elie and his father bear with not only builds up their trust in one another, but also brings their relationship with one another closer than ever before.

Samantha said...

The father-son relationship, between Elie and his father in Night, undergoes an emotional transformation. Initially, the connection among these two characters is rather strained and awkward. They are never intimate or dependent on each other, and Elie portrays the uncomfortable atmosphere by describing, “My father was a cultured, rather unsentimental man. There was never any display of emotion, even at home. He was more concerned with others than with his own family” (Wiesel 2). Elie’s father rarely expresses his feelings or any signs of emotion towards Elie, thus creating a large gap in their relationship. The important role Elie’s father plays in the Jewish community, Sighet, should actually be that of the Wiesel family. The community holds great esteem towards his father, but this is not the case for his family. Elie’s father busies himself with the matters of society, rather than his own flesh and blood. Elie does not receive the love and affection a son would usually obtain from his father. As the story advances and Elie and his father are sent to the harsh concentration camps, their relationship grows stronger in value. When the Jewish prisoners are evacuating from Buna, Elie actually considers to discontinue his run and giving in to death’s hands, but he remembers, “My father’s presence was the only thing that stopped me…I was his only support” (Wiesel 82). Fatigue and starvation at the horrific concentration camp opens Elie’s and his father’s eyes to the missing piece of their puzzle. Elie and his father have learned to lean on each other for support through such dreadful times. One cannot live without the other’s company, and the gap in the connection between father and son is closed with the fulfilling component of affection. Cherished emotions run high, and they begin to understand each other better through shared feelings. The newcome gentleness is exhibited by Elie’s father’s promise, “Don’t be afraid, son. Sleep-you can sleep. I’ll look after you myself” (Wiesel 85). Elie’s father reveals great tenderness in these simple words that encourage survival and moral support for the both of them. He expresses pure emotion and comfort towards his son, which touches his Elie deeply. They have gone through tough times together, therefore growing and getting to know each other better. The love and affection is empty in the beginning of their relationship, but are recovered from their time spent at the concentration camp. Elie realizes the importance of his father’s role in his life, and Elie’s father learns to open up and care for his only son. Although tragic experiences come about from harsh concentration camps, the positive outcome is the stronger bond in a father-son relationship between Elie Wiesel and his father.

Albert Li said...

Albert Li
Mrs. Brosnan
Period 3, English I, Honors
December 15, 2008

Elie goes through many brutal hardships of which changes his prospective of life. One of the biggest changes of which occurs is his relationship with his father. The relationship between the two is not so great, it seems there is no true connection between the two. As he says in the beginning of the story, “There was never any display of emotion, even at home. He was more concerned with others than with his own family.” (Wiesel 2). Here Elie expresses he feelings toward his father. Elie believes his father cares more about the community than his own family members. All of his attention is directed to the community and Elie feels his father does not care about his family. There clearly is no relationship that exists between the two. However, this relationship changes as the story progresses. The bond between them becomes greater as they go through the great suffering of which is the concentration camp. When they are going to Gleiwitz Elie is starting to give up. The presence of his father is what keeps him going. Elie thinks to himself, “To break the ranks, to let oneself slide to the edge of the road….My father’s presence was the only thing that stopped me….” (Wiesel 82). This statement shows the great change in the relationship of which he has with his father. Elie now cares substantially for his father, he is stating he would have given up if not for his father. If Elie is willing to keep on living through the living hell of which he goes through just by the mere presence of his father it means that their bond is much stronger than it was in the beginning of the story. It shows that he now has a sense of respect for his father. The concentration camps brings Elie much pain and suffering both physically and mentally, but if any good came out of it, it is the bond between Elie and his father becomes stronger.

Mekha Vadakkedam said...

Change is crucial in a person’s life, it may not occur swiftly but it is an important asset in one’s life. There is not a doubt that there is a drastic change in the relationship between Elie and his father. This change does not occur in a blink of an eye, but it is a smooth and slow process. When Elie and his father are working in a warehouse, a guard named Idek begins to beat Elie’s father with an iron bar, astonishingly, Elie’s reaction is, “I kept quiet. In fact I was thinking of how to get farther away so that I would not be hit myself… any anger I felt at that moment was directed…against my father. I was angry with him, for not knowing how to avoid Idek’s outbreak” (Wiesel 52). In the beginning, the only thing that Elie cares about is himself. He does not mind the fact that a stranger is abusing his weak, tormented father; he just wants to make sure that he, himself safe. Elie watches his father collapse and he feels no pain in his heart, no pity, no sorrow for his father. He does not attempt to stop the beating of his father, he does not move so he will not be beat also. Also, he blames his poor, innocent father for being a victim of Idek’s vicious path. Elie’s father, who happens to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, angers his only son because he is caught in Idek’s rage. Elie seems to be on the side of his murderers rather than his loving father. His relationship with is father is very weak at this point in their lives because Elie seems to be unharmed by the fact that his father his being harassed by an officer. When Elie and his father reach a shed after walking through long, cold hours to Gleiwitz, the SS men allow the men to rest. Elie and his father make a negotiation, Elie says, “‘I’ll watch over you, and then you can watch over me. We won’t let each other fall asleep. We’ll look after each other ‘” (Wiesel 85). Though when Elie says this he shows more care in his voice, he does not show complete compassion. He is still anticipating something from his father in return. He expects his father to watch him if he watches his father. He wants to know that he is being protected in return. This gesture may seem to be very heartfelt, but Elie is slightly showing that he cares more of himself, than of others. The relationship between Elie and his father is becoming stronger because Elie begins to love his father much more. During the final weeks of his father’s life, Elie’s father asks for some coffee, and Elie does this, “I cleared a way for myself to the coffee cauldron. And I managed to carry back a cupful. I had a sip. The rest was for him” (Wiesel 101). When Elie’s father asks for something, Elie caringly grants his father’s dying wishes. Even though Elie is extremely hungry, Elie stops himself from eating and drinking, just so his father will feel better. He shows that he loves his father and will do so much just so his father can stay alive and by his side. The relationship between Elie and his father dramatically changes because it goes from very weak and distant to extremely loving and emotional.

Emily Amaducci said...

Emily Amaducci
Mrs. Brosnan
English I, Honors, Period 3
December 15, 2008
In Night, by Elie Wiesel, Elie’s relationship with his father changes as the novel progresses. Eliezer’s relationship with his father starts to diminish throughout the awful times at the concentration camps. When they first enter Auschwitz, all Elie can think about is his father. Elie tells the reader, “I had one thought—not to lose him. Not to be left alone” (Wiesel 27). Elie is showing that he has to stay with his father. His father is all he has in the world and he deeply cares for him. He needs his father to survive, he has already lost his mother and sister, so his father is the only person he has to look up to. Eliezer needs his father’s protection and without him he would be all alone in the world. When you already have nothing to be alone makes you feel like you have no reason to live. Therefore, Elie needs his father and would give anything to be with him. However, as Elie goes through all of the experiences at each camp his relationship with his father begins to decline. Once in Buchenwald, Elie sees the negatives to having his father with him. Elie says, “If only I could get rid of this dead weight, so that I could use all my strength to struggle for my own survival and only worry about myself” (Wiesel 101). This proves that Elie no longer cares about his father as much as he did when they first arrived at Auschwitz. He also feels like he can move on in life without him even though his father is the only thing he has in the world. He is having doubts about having his father with him, which means that he no longer feels as if the comfort of his father is the only way that he can survive. He also no longer wants to have to worry about his father, which is why he refers to him as “dead weight”. By having to worry about his father Elie feels like that is taking away from himself and Elie only wants to focus on himself because he feels that is how he can survive. If Elie’s relationship with his father was still flourishing, he would never have the seeds of doubt in his head and would be trying everything to keep his father alive as long as he could. Thus, Eliezer Wiesel’s relationship transforms over the course of several years in the ghetto and at Auschwitz and Buchenwald.

Angie kieliszewski said...

Angie Kieliszewski
Mrs. Brosnan
Period 3, English I, Honors
December 15, 2008

Elie begins his life as an innocent, peaceful child. However, after living through death, starvation and hopelessness on a daily basis in the concentration camps, he becomes heavyhearted. One of the results of Elie’s new life in the concentration camps is a powerful change in the relationship Elie shares with his father. Their relationship used to be distant, but their bond becomes unbreakable, and filled with trust over time. This detached relationship is shown when Elie describes his father as being, “… more concerned with others than with his own family” (Wiesel 2). Before the Holocaust begins, Elie does not face any major problems, so he does not turn to his father for most of his life. Also, his father’s lack of emotion is slow to change, making it unlikely that Elie will ever share a deep, loving relationship with his father. However, once Elie and his father are forced into the concentration camps, this relationship changes entirely. The once meaningless relation turns into trust that is incomprehensible. For example, Elie’s father says, “… take this knife… I don’t need it any longer. Take what I’m giving you…the inheritance” (Wiesel 71). When Elie’s father feels he is about to die, he offers his son this small inheritance without thinking twice. Although this inheritance is a meager knife, it is the last item of importance that Elie’s father has. This father-son trust has become so great that Elie’s father feels entirely willing to offer this last valuable to his son in memory of him. Even when Elie and his father are facing an evil nightmare every day in concentration camps, this relationship manages to change from detached to completely trustworthy. The drastically changing relationship between Elie and his father proves that the power of trust will always triumph over evil.

canolidagreat512 said...

Eric Kenol
Under the circumstances that Elie faces through his life, change is inevitable. The relationship between Elie and his father, Chlomo, switches completely. Chlomo takes care of Elie just as a father should and acts as his guardian throughout their journey. After the prisoners forty two mile run to the next prison, Elie is full of fatigue but is afraid to sleep because he may die from the cold. His father tries to help him when he says, “Don’t be afraid son. Sleep-you can sleep- Ill look after you myself”(Wiesel 85). Chlomo is willing to give up the rest he needs to assure his sons safety. It is not only at this time, but also all Elie’s life his father has looks after him. Elie states that it is his father that is the only thing keeping him alive and from giving up. If Chlomo had not been there for Elie, he may have not able to survive the horrible events he goes through. As their time in the concentration camps went on in the winter, Elies father grows weaker. Day by day he comes closer to death and Elie must tend to him even more. Elie wants to take care of his father, but it is almost impossible in his conditions. Elie explains, “No better than Rabbi Eliahou’s son had I withstood the test”(Weisel 102). To understand this quote it must be known that Rabbi Eliahou’s son, while running with the other prisoners, saw his father start to slow down and fall to the back of the group. Instead of going to help him, his son keeps running with the hope that maybe he will not be able to run any longer and the SS will kill him. This way he only has to take care of himself. Elie takes care of his father who is struggling to survive and has to choose whether he should let his father die or try as hard as he can to give him just a bit more time. Now it is not Chlomo who is taking care of Elie, the roles change and Elie must make sacrifices to save himself and his father.

Brian Moy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Brian Moy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Brian Moy said...

Brian Moy
Mrs. Brosnan
Period 3, English 1 Honors
December 15, 2008

Positive change can sometimes arise from the effects of a catastrophe. One example of this positive change is Elie’s relationship with his father, Chlomo. In the novel Night, their relationship changes from selfish to considerate. This sense of selfishness is expressed in a scene where Chlomo is being beaten. While Elie’s, “…father had just been struck… I [Elie] had not flickered an eyelid” (Wiesel 37). Most sons would rush to defend their fathers from further harm or at least have a reaction of shock. However, Elie does not moved. Elie’s acts selfishly because he allows his father to be beaten instead of assisting him, in order to prevent any punishment for himself. Elie acted as if his father is a complete stranger. However, later on in the novel their relationship changes to compassionate. As the prisoners are forced to march in the brutal conditions, Elie refuses to abandon his father. As they run, Elie thinks, “I had no right to let myself die… I was his [Chlomo] only support. After all of the tragic events of the Holocaust, Elie continues to stay united his father. By this time of the war, many of the prisoners who are fit enough to survive dispose of the older people in order to relieve themselves of the burden. However, Elie realizes that he cannot die or leave because he feels that it is his responsibility to care for his father’s life. This shows that Elie and Chlomo’s bond is now filled with compassion and love. It proves that Elie will do anything in order to protect his father well being. Their relationship truly does change from selfish to considerate. Elie finally realizes that in his father's time of need, he cannot be the selfish young child he used to be and he must become a man.